Air pollution , not my problem, it's NIMB

Air pollution , not my problem, it’s NIMB

Do you know what NIMB is? It is the “Not In My Backyard” syndrome. It is Limited PerspectiveInjustice and InequalityObstruction of ProgressLack of Empathy.

The practice of manufacturing goods in countries with lower labor costs and fewer environmental regulations, while consuming the finished products in more developed nations, raises several ethical concerns. While it may contribute to economic growth and lower consumer prices, it can also lead to environmental degradation, exploitation of workers, and perpetuation of global inequalities.

Africa’s or third world air pollution might be affecting you also!

But no problem, when not in my backyard. (surprise, surprise, you and your family are inhaling it too)

The rising air quality pollution in Africa could pose a threat to other continents in several ways.

  • Long-range transport of pollutants: Air pollutants can travel long distances through the atmosphere, and they can be transported from Africa to other continents. For example, a study published in the journal Atmospheric Environment found that dust from the Sahara Desert can travel across the Atlantic Ocean and reach the United States. This dust can contribute to respiratory problems and other health problems in people living in affected areas.
  • Indirect impacts on climate change: Air pollution can also have indirect impacts on climate change. For example, black carbon is a type of air pollutant that can absorb sunlight and warm the atmosphere. Black carbon emissions from Africa have been shown to contribute to warming in other parts of the world.
  • Impacts on agriculture and food security: Air pollution can also damage crops and reduce agricultural productivity. This can lead to food shortages and make it more difficult to feed the world’s growing population.

In addition to these specific threats, the rising air quality pollution in Africa could also have a more general impact on global health and well-being. Air pollution is a major cause of respiratory disease, heart disease, and other health problems. It is estimated that air pollution causes seven million deaths worldwide each year.

The international community has a responsibility to help African countries address their air pollution problems. This could include providing financial and technical assistance, and helping to develop and implement air quality policies and regulations. It is also important to raise awareness of the air pollution problem in Africa and to encourage people to take action to reduce their own emissions.

Air quality in Africa has deteriorated significantly over the past 50 years, and its cities are now among the most polluted in the world. Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) levels are five to ten times higher than what the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends, and the situation is expected to worsen as the population grows and industrialization increases.

Big main causes of air pollution in Africa are:

  • The burning of biomass for cooking, heating, and lighting. This is the most common cause of air pollution in Africa, and it is responsible for the majority of PM2.5 emissions.
  • Industrial emissions from factories, power plants, and vehicles. These emissions contribute to PM2.5, as well as other pollutants such as sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2).
  • Desert dust. Dust from the Sahara Desert can be carried by the wind to other parts of Africa, where it can contribute to air pollution.

The health impacts of air pollution in Africa are significant. Air pollution is a major cause of respiratory disease, heart disease, stroke, and cancer. It is estimated that air pollution causes over 7 million deaths each year in Africa.

The international community is working to address air pollution in Africa. The African Union has adopted a Clean Air Strategy for Africa, which aims to reduce air pollution by 20% by 2030. The World Bank is also providing financial and technical assistance to African countries to help them reduce air pollution.

It is a global problem

Air pollution is a global problem that is not being adequately addressed. Only 0.01% of the global funding for air pollution control is spent in Africa.

“Inhaling this kind of dangerous air can cause complex and sometimes fatal health problems,” says Francis Pope, professor of atmospheric sciences.

Air pollution is a major cause of respiratory disease, heart disease, stroke, and cancer. It is estimated that air pollution causes seven million deaths each year worldwide.

The main causes of air pollution in Africa are:

  • Burning of biomass for cooking, heating, and lighting
  • Industrial emissions from factories, power plants, and vehicles
  • Desert dust

Air pollution is a serious problem that is having a devastating impact on the health of people in Africa. It is important to increase funding for air pollution control in Africa and to work to reduce emissions from all sources.

How far can air pollution travel?

Air pollution can travel long distances, depending on the type of pollutant and the weather conditions. Some pollutants, such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, can stay in the atmosphere for several days and travel hundreds or even thousands of miles. Other pollutants, such as particulate matter, can settle out of the atmosphere more quickly, but they can still travel several kilometers.

Here are some factors that affect how far air pollution can travel:

  • Wind speed and direction: Wind is the main force that transports air pollution. Pollutants are more likely to travel long distances when the wind is blowing in a consistent direction.
  • Temperature: Air pollution can travel farther in warmer temperatures because warm air can hold more moisture, which can help to keep pollutants suspended in the atmosphere.
  • Precipitation: Precipitation can help to remove pollutants from the atmosphere, but it can also transport pollutants long distances if it falls as rain or snow.
  • Topography: Mountains and other topographic features can trap air pollution, causing it to accumulate in certain areas.

The long-range transport of air pollution can have a significant impact on air quality in areas far from the source of the pollution. For example, air pollution from China can travel across the Pacific Ocean and reach the United States. This pollution can contribute to respiratory problems and other health problems in people living in affected areas.

Facts: air pollution from third world countries reaching first world countries.

  • A 2019 study published in the journal Nature Geoscience found that air pollution from China can travel across the Pacific Ocean and reach the United States. The study found that the pollution can contribute to respiratory problems and other health problems in people living in affected areas.
  • A 2020 study published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology found that air pollution from Africa can travel across the Atlantic Ocean and reach Europe. The study found that the pollution can contribute to respiratory problems, heart disease, and other health problems in people living in affected areas.
  • A 2021 study published in the journal Environmental Research Letters found that air pollution from South America can travel across the Atlantic Ocean and reach the Caribbean. The study found that the pollution can contribute to respiratory problems, heart disease, and other health problems in people living in affected areas.
  • A 2022 study published in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics found that air pollution from India can travel across the Indian Ocean and reach the Middle East. The study found that the pollution can contribute to respiratory problems, heart disease, and other health problems in people living in affected areas.

These studies all provide evidence that air pollution from third world countries can reach first world countries. This is a serious problem that can have a significant impact on public health.

Besides the fact that using cheap labour, profit from cheap manufacturing and living the good life, you might have also a responsibility to third world countries because they provides your luxury lifestyle.

Luckily there is a growing recognition that developed countries have a responsibility to third world countries, in part because they benefit from the resources and labor of these countries. This responsibility is often referred to as “global justice” or “global fairness.”

There are a number of arguments in favor of global justice. One argument is that all people are equal and deserve to live a decent life, regardless of where they are born. Another argument is that developed countries have benefited from the exploitation of third world countries, and that they now have a moral obligation to help these countries develop.

There are a number of ways in which developed countries can fulfill their responsibility to third world countries. These include:

  • Providing development aid: Developed countries can provide financial and technical assistance to help third world countries develop their economies and improve their infrastructure.
  • Promoting fair trade: Developed countries can promote fair trade practices that give third world countries a better chance of competing in the global market.
  • Reducing debt: Developed countries can help third world countries reduce their debt burden, which can free up resources for development.
  • Addressing climate change: Developed countries can take action to address climate change, which disproportionately affects third world countries.

In addition to these specific actions, developed countries can also fulfill their responsibility to third world countries by adopting a more just and equitable global order. This includes respecting the sovereignty of third world countries, listening to their voices, and working with them to solve global problems.

By taking these steps, developed countries can help to create a more just and equitable world in which all people have the opportunity to live a decent life.